Author Topic: Winter Riding  (Read 4783 times)

Offline ciso

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Winter Riding
« on: December 13, 2007, 01:47:35 AM »
Does anybody up here ride in the winter. ? And if so, are there any rides lined up in the Vancouver area of Wa ?
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Offline Red01

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2007, 04:50:28 PM »
I ride in the winter, but only when it's dry and above freezing... which somewhat limits things.  I usually stick a little closer to home, riding north of Seattle.
(I just don't find any fun riding in the rain or when there's a possibilty of icy roads with a big, heavy, road bike anymore.  Don't mind taking the more dirt worthy bikes out for a spin in the snow though.)
Paul
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Offline ciso

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2007, 05:06:11 PM »
Certainly agree with the rain part.
We have had a few nice days, rather no rain and I have the gear so I stay warm.
I keep my bikes in a nice warm garage and I hate having to clean them after they get wet.
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Offline CWO4GUNNER

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2007, 06:56:44 PM »
Here is an honest question I would like an answer too. You take off on a day ride with a group in WA on a clear dry and below freezing day. On the way back snow starts to fall and the state police are pulling over cars to install chains, what do motorcycles do? Also if you encounter black ice around the bend on approach or over a small bridge, is the expectation of slipping the same as in a cage or are you even more alarmed?
« Last Edit: December 14, 2007, 06:58:18 PM by CWO4GUNNER »

ippo

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2007, 03:16:54 AM »
Here is an honest question I would like an answer too. You take off on a day ride with a group in WA on a clear dry and below freezing day. On the way back snow starts to fall and the state police are pulling over cars to install chains, what do motorcycles do? Also if you encounter black ice around the bend on approach or over a small bridge, is the expectation of slipping the same as in a cage or are you even more alarmed?


Like this in finland.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2007, 03:19:14 AM by ippo »

Offline CWO4GUNNER

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2007, 03:11:15 PM »
SEE! Now thats what I call a comprehensive answer, thanks ippo!  I think they use walnut shell tires in the Pacific North West. Had a good friend from Oregon who had them on while visiting one winter, tires would howl like a screech owl when skidding on dry pavement.
  So ippo, how often do you have to replace the metal spikes and do you use the same metal spiked tire for each winter, or just install new metal spikes when needed in a tire regular tire new or used tire?
Here is an honest question I would like an answer too. You take off on a day ride with a group in WA on a clear dry and below freezing day. On the way back snow starts to fall and the state police are pulling over cars to install chains, what do motorcycles do? Also if you encounter black ice around the bend on approach or over a small bridge, is the expectation of slipping the same as in a cage or are you even more alarmed?


Like this in finland.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2007, 03:51:35 PM by CWO4GUNNER »

Offline Heyu

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2007, 03:58:32 PM »
pretty sure they don't use those on the street gunner you asked if they were out for a ride and they hit snow what would they do my guess is park, thats what I had to do when caught out in a spring storm in Two Harbours Minn. We parked till the roads cleared enough that we could ride in our lane, once the plows were able to clear a lane and the salt and sand were well laid down, and the weather cleared we were able to make a very wet and cold ride back to Canada, it did take quite a few hours longer as we were very cold and you have to stop to get you're feet working again.
 Riding on those studs of ippo's on dry pavement would not be an option, Sheet metal screws would work better for that situation.

ippo

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2007, 04:07:24 AM »
The first tire (imago 1) are for ices (lakes and woods no road)
Little spikes you can ride all kind of roads.(image 2).
New metal spikes alternate when needed.
http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=1121229968109832747
Something like this..
« Last Edit: December 16, 2007, 11:45:06 AM by ippo »

Offline Red01

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2007, 01:55:24 PM »
Here is an honest question I would like an answer too. You take off on a day ride with a group in WA on a clear dry and below freezing day. On the way back snow starts to fall and the state police are pulling over cars to install chains, what do motorcycles do? Also if you encounter black ice around the bend on approach or over a small bridge, is the expectation of slipping the same as in a cage or are you even more alarmed?

1) I wouldn't go out on a below freezing day in WA because this time of year you can NEVER be certain there'd be no black ice because shaded areas would be damp when above freezing and translate to ice.  I think my butt would be sucking in a lot of seat cushion if I encountered black ice on any road bike with ordinary street tires, especially a heavy one with 100+ horsepower, like a 1200/1250 Bandit.

2) I've never seen it snow in the lowlands bad enough the police would pull people over and require them to chain up.  Unforcasted lowland snow, even in light amounts, is pretty much unheard of. Mountain roads do get dumped on by surprise occasionally. The police do pull people over on the mountain passes and require them to chain up, but before that happens, the word is usually out on the news and highway signs that winter traction is required well before they step it up to chains requred.  By that time, the snow is in such quantities that motorcycles wouldn't be out in it unless they sported tires like ippo has shown us - or something even more extreme, like this:



Occasionally a rider CAN get caught in the mountains when you'd think everything would be OK and get caught in an early fall or late spring snow... just ask PMackie about his little adventure last year.  :wink:
Paul
2001 GSF1200S
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2010 Concours 14ABS
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Offline CWO4GUNNER

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2007, 02:31:52 PM »
Thanks Red01, cant imagine getting run over by something like that, but I bet it works great. Something to consider if one toured to Alaska.

Offline Sven

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2007, 02:33:35 PM »
This is a fascinating thread.  The tire in Paul's pic looks like something from Mad Max.  (And have you seen the new Batpod?  http://www.filmwad.com/batman-s-batpod-revealed--2985-p.html

Anyway, I 've never lived anywhere that snow tires were required, even in WV and OH, the snow was usually short lived and in the city, they would plow the streets and spread ashes so we could drive (carefully) after snow.  It alwasy seemed like a lot of trouble to have to put studded tires on and off throughout the winter, but on a bike, where the final drive is between the wheel and you...it just doesn't seem worth the effort.

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Offline ciso

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2007, 03:30:53 PM »
I never ride below freezing if I can help it but a bit above is ok for me. Always thinking about the shade areas even when the sun is. Some roads take a lot longer to melt off the ice if there is any.
But I take advantage of any days with no rain and maybe just below or above 40 degrees.
I draw the line at snow and ice, brittle old bones and all that.
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Offline pmackie

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2007, 02:45:18 AM »
Quote
Occasionally a rider CAN get caught in the mountains when you'd think everything would be OK and get caught in an early fall or late spring snow... just ask PMackie about his little adventure last year. 

Yup...not much fun.

Gunner, if you get caught in the snow, like I did, you have a decision to make:
1. Is it safer to ride to somewhere else (like DOWN the mountain in my case) or
2. Can you safely park the bike and hitch a ride.

When I ran into snow on the way to meet Red01 and Bobcat, it was about 500-700 ft elevation before the summit. I slowed WAY down and would have parked, but still basically had a clear "wheel track" at the pullout at the top. I wrongly assumed I would run out of the snow with the first km (0.6 mile)down from the summit, but the snow got worse. I finally had the front wash on me in 4" of snow and hit the road. The bad part was sitting there on a steep, downhill slight corner, with cars coming down the hill towards me, and transports spinning and stuck on the uphill beside me. I looked like another accident waiting to happen. I decided I HAD to get downhill to a safer place, and so got the bike back up on its wheels and started bulldogging/outriggering at about 3 kmph (2mph). The conditions were very bad, with no good pullout options for several kms. Once I had a safe place to pull off, I had a wet wheel track back, so I continued to ride downhill.

Best lesson for me, once I see snow in the air, turn around and find a safe, warm place to park.
Paul
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Offline CWO4GUNNER

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #13 on: December 17, 2007, 04:37:08 PM »
Would it have been possible at the summit to install some or screw in studs if you had them and the tool to install them? would it had made a big difference? And would it be worth carrying a pound of studs tucked away for that possible scenario? Supposedly something like this is all you would need in a much shallower thread, probubly 1/4 inch would not puncture the tire, a minimum of 32 in pairs per tire would get you home or to a hotel safely. Just a cheap idea I had if I were to take a trip to Alaska.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2007, 04:54:07 PM by CWO4GUNNER »

Offline pmackie

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Re: Winter Riding
« Reply #14 on: December 18, 2007, 12:39:46 AM »
Possible but likely not practical.

Depending on the wear on the tires, even 1/4" is likely too long and anything shorter won't stay in.

One option I have seen done is to wrap a rope around the wheel and tire to operate as a type of tire chain. I haven't tried it though.
Paul
2002-GSF600S, Progressive Fork Springs, B12 Shock,
SS Brake lines, EBC HH pads, Leo Vince Ex & Kappa bags.
Ex Bike Mechanic (late 70's), somewhat rusty
32 years in the Fuel/lubes industry(Retired)