Author Topic: Chain Oiler Survey  (Read 32802 times)

Offline pmackie

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #30 on: February 27, 2006, 01:24:06 AM »
Nothing wrong with using Summer Chain Bar Oil. It will usually be an ISO 150 or 220 Viscosity (similar to an SAE 50 auto oil or SAE 90 gear oil) with some takifier (stringiness additive to reduce fling off) and in some high quality Chain Bar oils, even some Antiwear and/or EP additives. It should not cause any problems with the O-Rings in the chain.

You can also use some SAE 80W90 gear oil (all GL5 rated oils will have EP additives) and add your own takifier, such as STP or Lucas style motor honey ( I would NOT use these additives in any of my engines however) and come up with a great chainlube.

However, buy a jug or two of the chain bar oil and use it in the oiler and the chainsaw.
Paul
2002-GSF600S, Progressive Fork Springs, B12 Shock,
SS Brake lines, EBC HH pads, Leo Vince Ex & Kappa bags.
Ex Bike Mechanic (late 70's), somewhat rusty
32 years in the Fuel/lubes industry(Retired)

Offline b4cruz

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #31 on: April 24, 2006, 01:53:52 PM »
Anone find or have read about good results using ATF in the chain oiler?
I read some BMW techs use cheap red ATF on single650 bikes
and can get over 40k miles out of a chain with the auto-oiler.

Offline Red01

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #32 on: April 24, 2006, 04:36:08 PM »
With ATF being about a 10 weight oil, it seems like it might be on the light side, but I've heard of people using striaght 30w - and that's probably cheaper than ATF
Paul
2001 GSF1200S
(04/2001-03/2012)
2010 Concours 14ABS
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Offline Vee Dub Nut

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #33 on: May 16, 2006, 12:31:14 PM »
I just got done installing the Pro-oiler on my 98 B12...

I am very happy with the results, fully automated means I can adjust for changing conditions. Being that its pumped, temperature changes and viscosity changes have no effect on the capablilities of the oiler. Lastly, just not having to ever mess with the chain is a big thing to me....

Highly reccomend it or some other automatic oiler to really simplify your life..
Adam in College Station Texas

1996 Bandit 750s - SOLD!
1998 Bandit 1200s - SOLD!
2000 VW GTi GLX
1967 VW Beetle* slight modifictations

Offline Bazza

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Pro Oiler Update
« Reply #34 on: July 22, 2006, 06:16:52 PM »
Well it is now official, since the installation of the Pro-Oiler and new chain & sprokets I have gone 16,230 km or 10,085 miles unitl my first chain adjustment! I should add that I only adjusted about half of one of the marks. I could have went longer but I am planning a big trip next week.

I have had several comments about, "I see you just put on a new chain". I have not had to clean the chain since installation, and it looks like it just came out of the package. The constant drip washes off any dirt before it can build up.

I have finally got the Oiler set up to where I want it (I origionally had too high a seed factor programed in) On my last trip, I used about 250 cc (half the bottle) to ride 2300 km on the highway.

Best lube I have found is Chain bar oil (for chainsaws). I origionally had started with 90 w gear oil but find that this stains the frame near the sidestand (from run off) while the bar oil does not. I also mixed in a bottle of teflon engine treatment I had in my garage for ages, which seems to help with keeping the oil on the chain, but really not required.

I found out about the Pro Oiler from a few of the people on the sport touring network who are claiming 30,000 mile chain life. I was skeptical, but now I am a 100% believer. If in fact I can get 30,000 miles out of this chain, the pro oiler will have paid for itself. Sooner if you calculate the cost of chain lube I don't buy anymore. Let's just say that the 1st thing I buy for any future chain driven bikes is a pro oiler, although I can take this one with me for the next bike.

I have started to do a great deal of touring with the bandit, and if you do the same a pro oiler is the best investment you will make. Not so much if you are just going for short little jaunts around town.

Offline malonef

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #35 on: September 13, 2006, 09:48:45 PM »
I have had my Hawkoiler installed for two Summers now and am quite happy with it. It quit on me once but that was due to the dunce who installed it javascript:emoticon(':bigok:'): . Now it works perfectly. I do have to remember to give it 8 to 10 pumps every 80 miles or so and more often when raining, but the chain also looks like new after 20,000 miles.

Offline malonef

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #36 on: September 13, 2006, 09:49:53 PM »
Oh, I forgot. I have been using Mobil 1 75/90 full synthetic gear lube but may try the chain saw ol when this bottle runs out.

Offline Banditclimax

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Re: Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #37 on: November 10, 2006, 07:51:39 PM »
Quote from: "Red01"
If you have a chain oiler, please vote in this poll and respond with your positive and/or negative experiences with the setup.
 Hello fellow Bandit riders.  I use Zoom Spout All Purpose Oil.  I originally picked it up for oiling the bearings on a swamp/evaporative cooler, because it comes with a telescoping pull-out spout.  Great for getting into tight spaces.  Put out by Dial MFG. Inc in Phoenix AZ.  Part #5713.  I also use Kerosine to clean the links, and lubricate the rubber O-rings on my chain.  So far, I am very happy with this method.  Hope this helps, Banditclimax
"High is dry, and white is right".  Wise advice given to me by a CHP motorcycle officer, after he watched me go down upon hitting diesel fuel on a freeway interchange.  From another experienced rider, "ride the bike, don't let the bike ride you".

Offline egads1

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chainoiler
« Reply #38 on: April 17, 2007, 02:40:29 PM »
I have been suing a Scottoiler on my 99 B12 since 2000.  My original chain lasted 42000 miles.  And needed just a couple of adjustments in that time.  I also added one to my FZ1 as soon as I purchased the bike.   :motorsmile:  :motorsmile:  :motorsmile:

Offline JReviere

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #39 on: April 25, 2007, 08:45:12 PM »
I discovered years ago, using Lithium based general purpose grease containing upwards of 40% Molly, a process to clean the chain, then slather it well with the grease, and after as much as 10,000 miles, the rollers were still well lubricated with the highly viscous and very slippery Molly lube.  I use nothing else.  

JReviere, Ph.D
Lake Livingston, Tx
Live Long and Prosper.

Offline pmackie

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #40 on: April 25, 2007, 11:13:59 PM »
Quote
Lithium based general purpose grease containing upwards of 40% Molly


To have something like 40% Moly (Molybdenum Disulphide), you must be talking about some type of AntiSieze compound. Most moly greases use between 4-7% moly, which is what I think you mean. So something like a chassis grease c/w moly?

Concept is good, but how do you apply it? It can be pretty messy to apply grease to a chain. It may not easily lubricate the o-rings unless you can force it down the side plates, but it should keep the wear down on the sprockets.
Paul
2002-GSF600S, Progressive Fork Springs, B12 Shock,
SS Brake lines, EBC HH pads, Leo Vince Ex & Kappa bags.
Ex Bike Mechanic (late 70's), somewhat rusty
32 years in the Fuel/lubes industry(Retired)

Offline JReviere

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #41 on: April 25, 2007, 11:54:59 PM »
You are probably correct about the amount of Moly... Using an "O" Ring chain, which as I understand is internally lubricated during manufacture, negates the necessity of penetrating doesn't it?

I just use a flat paddle about 3/4" wide and slather it on the top of the bottom of the chain where as the wheel turns, the applied grease contacts the rear sproket.  Another good tool would be the paint stir paddles paint departments such as Lowes hand out when you buy paint. Anyway, in front of the rear sprocket there's about 6 inches of chain exposed... By slathering the grease on the "inside" of the chain, as it runs on the sprockets, grease is shoved  into the chain. At least that's what it appears to me to do.  

When I'm done, I wipe off excess from the side plates of the chain, and take it for a ride...

JReviere
Live Long and Prosper.

Offline SteelD

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #42 on: April 26, 2007, 05:46:53 AM »
Quote from: "txbanditrydr"
Quote from: "meanstrk"
Been seeing some great reviews on the Dupont Teflon stuff though and I may give that a shot on my Aprilia or Katana.

Don't Do It

Please explain - it doesn't work, it destroys the bike, it's not suitable for all bikes? Don't leave us hanging by a thread - I fancy trying this on my next bike.
David
Bandit 1250SAK7 Graphite Metallic Blue (YLE)


Offline drewpy_dawg

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #43 on: May 14, 2007, 09:59:19 PM »
Quote from: "b4cruz"
Anone find or have read about good results using ATF in the chain oiler?
I read some BMW techs use cheap red ATF on single650 bikes
and can get over 40k miles out of a chain with the auto-oiler.

My friend uses ATF on his BMW single, probably got the idea from the same board you saw it on.  He was very happy with it and felt it was working better than the chain wax he was using before that.  If nothing else, it didn't hold gunk as much.  
I'm trying it in my loobman.  Considering how non-diy (impatience and easily frustrated) I am it went very well and once I get the bike back I'll be interested in how my chain life goes.
2002 Bandit 1200s - Blue - Holeshot exhaust, pod filters and dynojet stage 3 jet kit and carbon fiber look accessories.  
2006 Hyosung Avitar GV-650 (wife's bike) -Silver- bone stock (and pretty darn fun to ride)

Offline txbanditrydr

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Chain Oiler Survey
« Reply #44 on: May 14, 2007, 10:45:53 PM »
Quote from: "SteelD"
Quote from: "txbanditrydr"
Quote from: "meanstrk"
Been seeing some great reviews on the Dupont Teflon stuff though and I may give that a shot on my Aprilia or Katana.

Don't Do It

Please explain - it doesn't work, it destroys the bike, it's not suitable for all bikes? Don't leave us hanging by a thread - I fancy trying this on my next bike.

The phrase "Don't Do It" was a hot link...  I'll see if I can dig up the original post.

Edit.... Found it.  Try this "Don't Do It" (click me) link.
'01 B600S ... sold
'05 B1200S ... Top 20 mods... #20 through #2 - All The Usual Ones, Yada, Yada  & #1... 150,000+ Miles and Counting!!!!